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Flor de Sal Hotel Viana do Castelo
Flor de Sal Hotel Viana do Castelo
Flor de Sal Hotel Viana do Castelo
Flor de Sal Hotel Viana do Castelo
Flor de Sal Hotel Viana do Castelo
Flor de Sal Hotel Viana do Castelo
Flor de Sal Hotel Viana do Castelo
Flor de Sal Hotel Viana do Castelo
Description
Amenities
The Surf
Flor de Sal

The Hotel Flor de Sal is a 4 star hotel located in the beautiful city of Viana do Castelo, 76 Kms north of Porto. The Hotel is on the Coast, facing the Atlantic Ocean, and benefits from superb sea views.

Located within breathtaking surroundings, the hotel offers high quality accommodation and a great variety of leisure activities. The interior has been carefully decorated to include a number of details of modern design. The hotel has 60 bedrooms, including a luxury suite, two executive suites, six junior suites, and two rooms suitable for guests with disabilities. Flor de Sal Hotel has 31 rooms with a sea view all with their own balcony or terrace. The Hotel restaurant, Saleiro, offers a variety of expertly prepared dishes offers a concept of honest food and a range of carefully selected wines. The overall ambiance the restaurant aims to provide is fresh, bright, young, inspiring and with a minimalistic approach.

Viana do Castelo is an historical and full of charm city.

+351 258 800 100
www.hotelflordesal.com

Flor de Sal Amenities
  • HD TV
  • Wifi
  • Security Safe
  • Airco
  • Parking
  • Pool
  • Fitness
  • Massage
  • Spa
  • Hammam
  • Sauna
  • Beauty Salon
  • Bar
  • Lounge
  • Restaurant
  • Daily Cleaning
  • Room Service
  • 24h Reception
The Surf

Sitting on the western edge of Europe, Portugal has always been a little bit different. The northern provinces of Minho and Douro have largely skipped the attention of visiting surfers, despite having a trove of surf and cultural resources. This super-consistent stretch of coast grabs the maximum from any swell direction and provides a wide range of wave breaking surfaces from gentle beaches and rivermouths to sheer slab reefs. Minho province shares many characteristics with its northern Spanish neighbour, Galicia, meaning lots of hills, lots of greenery and lots and lots of rain. Porto is the capital of Douro province, where it isn’t quite as wet, but the bleak industrial landscape combines with the weather to help deter visiting surfers. However it’s the pollution around Porto that might be the biggest turn off in north Portugal. It gets so dirty that the local authorities sometimes put a ban on people entering the sea at all! The mouth of the Douro River and the beaches a good way to the north and south are classed as one of the most polluted places in Europe and surfing should be avoided anywhere between Espinho and Vila do Conde. Situation is getting better thanks to EU grants helping to fund water treatment facilities. Crowds and localism are an issue at some of the banner breaks, but there is plenty of room to move and options for all levels of ability.

The northern provinces of Minho and Douro have largely skipped the attention of visiting surfers, despite having a trove of surf and cultural resources. This super consistent stretch of coast grabs the maximum from any swell direction and provides a wide range of wave breaking surfaces from gentle beaches and rivermouths to sheer slab reefs. Minho province shares many characteristics with its northern Spanish neighbour, Galicia, – lots of hills, lots of greenery and lots and lots of rain. Porto is the capital of Douro province, where it isn’t quite as wet, but the bleak industrial landscape combines with the weather to help deter visiting surfers. However it’s the pollution around Porto that might be the biggest turn off in north Portugal. It gets so dirty that the local authorities sometimes put a ban on people entering the sea at all! The best time for a surf trip around here is late spring through to autumn. The north winds that plague much of the country don’t seem to be as bad here. The Minho river demarcates the border with Spain and sometimes provides hollow rights at its mouth. The average quality and consistency beachbreak peaks of Moledo do Minho are adjacent to sand-covered reefs that can turn perfect at lower tides, but get crowded. The southern end of Vila Praia de Âncora offers a much more consistent beachbreak in NW swells and is usually quieter. The serious surf starts in Afife with a high quality beachbreak often likened to Supertubos, but without the crowds. It’s consistent, very fast, hollow and prefers a SW swell with a low to mid tide. Viana do Castelo, home of the Portuguese branch of Surfrider Foundation, hides a beautiful beach S of town called Cabadelo. Take a ferry or drive around to access the quite inconsistent but large righthander breaking off the river jetty that offers some N wind protection. If it’s too small, drive 30km (19mi) south to the very consistent west-facing beachbreak just north of Esposende. It won’t handle much size, the water is very cold but crowds are minimal. Check Aguçadoura for an endless beach with numerous quality peaks, the water here is super clean but it gets out of control when big. 5km (3mi) offshore float the Pelamis “sea snakes” that use the energy of waves to generate electricity. Experts should try the quality reefbreak left at Pòvoa do Varzim; it’s short, sharp, shallow and full of open barrels in a SW swell. The neighbouring town of Vila do Conde is a popular place for the people of Porto. Near a bunch of rocks on the town centre beach, breaks a short, hollow punchy lefthander that can get busy due to its reliability. On the other side of the river, Azurara delivers mediocre but consistent beach peaks with better wind protection and a good shorebreak for bodyboarding. It’s the first spot north of Porto with genuinely clean water. Similar waves can be found in Perafita, but the background is much more industrial and the rocks surrounding the beach are even hot to the touch! There are plenty of barrels in Leça over highly consistent sandbars but few takers thanks to ridiculous pollution levels. In case of a massive swell, head to Matosinhos on the south side of the port and north of the rivermouth. The breakwater is a real swell filter here, but lifeguards red flag the beach when pollution levels are high (all the time), though many locals ignore the ban. The same extreme pollution affects all the breaks to the south including Luz, where the sandbars deliver semi-sheltered waves and the rare but epic rivermouth rights of Barra do Porto. Miramar can be excellent thanks to a high quality righthander that breaks over the reef near the offshore island. It’s fickle, but fast and hollow with potential barrels in a solid NW swell. Espinho is the best spot in north Portugal despite the pollution, localism and heavy crowds. The jetty of this dilapidated city holds a long, consistent tubey right with good protection from the “nortada” winds. Watch out for the inside section that closes-out over shallow rocks.

When to Go
North Portugal has an Atlantic climate influenced by the Gulf Stream. The best time for a surf trip around here is late spring through to autumn. Because of its open exposure to the frequent NW swells, Portugal is hyper-consistent year-round and often receives massive swells in winter. Average swell is around 8-10ft (2.5-3m) in winter with 12-15ft (4-5m) peaks, and a solid 4-6ft (1.2-2m) in summer. Dominant winds are moderate N-NW, named “la Nortada”, which often blows from April to September. Summer sea breezes often mess up the waves. Erosion has led to the construction of several jetties, offering good shelter from the big winter swells and pesky summer winds. Semi-diurnal tides reach up to 12ft (3.6m); avoid the highest tides as a vast majority of beachbreaks won’t deliver their best.

https://www.lowpressure.co.uk/

Flor de Sal

From $128 per day
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